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Top 5 Dr. Seuss Books

by Paul Sanders
Published May 6, 2011 | Updated July 27, 2015

Limiting this list to just five of Dr. Seuss's classic children's books undoubtedly leaves out a few favorites. Readers of all ages have been affected by the insightful subject matter, unforgettable illustrations, and fun rhymes that characterize Dr. Seuss books. These five titles are just a few of the essential stories by this iconic author that you'll want to add to your children's library. Here are the top five Dr. Seuss books.

Classic Books by Dr. Seuss:

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  1. The Cat in the Hat

    Possibly the most recognizable of all Dr. Seuss books, The Cat in the Hat has been translated into both live-action and animated versions for TV and the big screen. Dr. Seuss spins a story about two bored, young children stuck inside on a rainy day. Their day goes from dull to out-of-control with the arrival of the mischevious Cat in the Hat. This Doctor Seuss book perfectly illustrates a child's unlimited desire for fun but also highlights the necessity and importance of rules.

  2. Green Eggs and Ham

    Some Dr. Seuss books cross the border into the absurdly funny, which is where Green Eggs and Ham takes young readers. The main character is -- like so many kids -- unwilling to try a new food, and is hounded by Sam I Am to give it a chance. Like other Dr. Seuss books, this title is full of simple and repetitive rhymes, which are fun to read.

  3. Horton Hears a Who

    Seuss's story of an elephant who makes friends with a microscopic city of beings, called "Whos," has also made it to the big screen. Horton Hears a Who is more story than rhyme oriented and is meant for children with a little more reading experience.

  4. The Sneetches and Other Stories

    This collection of moral tales includes several stories in an allegorical style, typical of Seuss's writing. The Sneetches learn a lesson in envy and acceptance, teaching kids the arbitrary differences between social groups. The Sneetches and Other Stories falls in with other Dr. Seuss books aimed at older children.

  5. How the Grinch Stole Christmas

    Some Dr. Seuss books are better known for their animated counterparts, the story of the Grinch possibly being the best example. The animated cartoon is still shown worldwide during the holiday season, but the illustrations of How the Grinch Stole Christmas are iconic on their own, following the whimsical cartoon style that makes Dr. Seuss books so popular.