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Tips on Buying a Porch Swing

by Lindsay Wilcox

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White wooden porch swing holds a basket of flowers

Create a peaceful place to relax or read and buy a porch swing for your home. A wooden porch swing can add a rustic, old-fashioned touch to your entryway, while an iron swing works with contemporary styles. No matter which outdoor swing you prefer, you're sure to find the hammocks and swings you like with the following suggestions. Read on for tips on buying a porch swing.

Buying a Porch Swing:

  1. Choose a material you like. Outdoor swings are made from a variety of materials, including wicker, wrought iron, plastic and, of course, wood. A white or brown patio swing made of durable recycled plastic can complement an old-fashioned brick home or a modern one that features an open patio. If you would like a classic look, choose a wooden porch swing made of wood that suits the style of your home. Wooden swings made of oak or ash will contrast against a house with dark bricks or siding, while swings made of teak, maple or cherry wood will add depth to a classic white or pastel-colored home.

  2. Consider your climate. Before you buy a porch or patio swing for your home, you'll want to think about the weather in the area. Plastic swings may work best in areas that receive a lot of rain or snow, as these swings are easy to clean and withstand a lot of wear. An iron swing is also heavy and sturdy enough to withstand wind and snow. If you have your heart set on wooden swings but live in a wet climate, you can always coat them with waterproof sealants to make them more weather-resistant. A classic white wicker swing will work best in a warm climate as it will stretch and become misshapen if it gets too wet.

  3. Pick a sturdy, supportive swing style. While you may think of broad, hanging swings when you consider buying porch or garden swings for your home, you can also buy swings that are hung from separate frames for security or even find styles that glide rather than swing. If you don't have a supportive roof joist you can hang your swing from, you'll want to stay away from hanging swings. Fortunately, many types of garden swings, including wooden, wrought-iron and wicker styles, are designed with separate frames and can easily fit on many front or back porches. You'll be sitting in your comfortable wicker swing and relaxing in no time.

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